Life still happens after the miracle

8″But if it were, I would appeal to God; I would lay my cause before him. 9He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted.  – Job 5:8,9

I just got off the phone with one of my dearest friends. I don’t think she would mind me sharing that she has recently been miraculously healed. I will assume that if I say someone was miraculously healed, that you already know by Whom the healing comes.

So yeah, like from – you are going to die very soon – to walking, talking, playing tennis, back-to-her-old-self kind of healing. Amazing, God is.

Miracles are great, but life still happens after the miracle. Second chances, fifth chances, thirty-third chances – what do we do after the miracle?

That whole – live like you were dying thing – kind of silly. What does living like you were dying even look like? Splurging, saying yes to everything, traveling, doing all you can before you head Home? I have a feeling that there are more important and even some mundane things that we might be led to reach for. God may have healed you just to simply have you here to speak more to that unbeliever, to that believer, to your spouse, to help that 90 year old person in the neighborhood, to love your family more, smile at the angry worker behind the counter just because, or to mature you more in His Word. Sometimes everything we know is not everything we need to know. There is more.

Life after the miracle doesn’t have to be a Broadway Show. The Show that matters? Showing up each day for God. It may be a ho-hum day, it may be a roller coaster day, I guarantee you is this, God is anything but boring. He has shown himself to me to be adventurous, spontaneous, FUNNY, glorious, brilliant, creative, gentle and patient. He heals and then something changes and He heals again. And again. And yet, again. Being healed today doesn’t guarantee you’ll be healed tomorrow. But, guess what!? You’re healed TODAY.

What do you do when you need a miracle? You tell everybody who will pray. He will be faithful. It’s not the magnitude of the miracle. It’s the magnitude of the Healer.

 

You may have seen this in the past, good read…

My baby nephew was dying and his mother’s response was unforgettable

My seven-month-old nephew Canaan was dying and nobody knew it, including his doctor, who had misdiagnosed his digestive issues. The real issue was Hirschsprung’s disease, one of the leading causes of death for kids like Canaan, who has Down Syndrome.

One afternoon, Canaan became totally listless — to the point of almost looking dead. By the time my brother Caleb and his wife, Rebecca, got Canaan to the emergency room, his body had gone into septic shock. Doctors and nurses scrambled to rescue him as someone quickly ushered Caleb and Rebecca into the waiting area.

Right there in the emergency room, Rebecca did something remarkable: She got down on her knees and said, “God, I’m going to worship You right now. No matter what happens, You’re still holy. You’re still good.”

Caleb and Rebecca’s trust in God’s goodness would be tested in the coming days. Canaan was on life support and the doctors kept bringing one negative report after another. The extraordinary measures they were taking weren’t working.

Four days after Canaan was admitted, a doctor sat down with Caleb and Rebecca and made it clear where things were headed: “Canaan is climbing a mountain that’s too high for him, and we’re just trying to make him comfortable at this point.”

Nothing could be done to save him — or so it seemed.

In the days before social media, we began a massive prayer movement with the help of an email that was forwarded around the world. Hundreds of people joined our family in standing in faith for Canaan.

A couple of days later, doctors reported that something unexplainable was happening: Canaan’s badly damaged small intestine was churning back to life. His little body was making a comeback.

It’s hard to convey the thrill of that news to everyone. There were cheers and celebratory emails going around, high-fives and hallelujahs. But after we got our breakthrough, the miracle got complicated.

Canaan gradually improved, but he still spent several weeks in the hospital. Since then, he has been through countless surgeries, survived serious infections and still has significant digestive problems.

Yes, he brings a great deal of love and joy to our family, but it comes with a heavy burden for him.

Our miracle didn’t fix everything.

Maybe you’re asking God for a miraculous intervention today. He may very well provide it — a baby, a spouse, a job, a financial breakthrough or healing. Until we get that miracle, it’s easy to think, “If I just get this one thing I’m asking for, I’ll know for sure that God is good.”

Miracles do powerfully reveal God’s goodness, but then we have to keep on living everyday life, which is often full of disappointment and grief.

We’re not alone in that though. “Even though Jesus was God’s Son, He learned obedience from the things He suffered” (Hebrews 5:8). If Jesus, the miracle maker, didn’t get a pass on suffering, we won’t either.

Jesus said, “Blessed are those who believe without seeing Me” (John 20:29). And in those lonesome hours when we can’t see Him, we’ve got to ask God for the gift of faith.

Only God can give us the grace to believe when it seems like there’s no miracle to be found; but when He does, the result is truly miraculous. We can, like my sister-in-law, bow down in the darkness and declare, “God, I’m going to worship You right now. No matter what happens, You’re still holy. You’re still good.”

 

One thought on “Life still happens after the miracle

  1. I started reading this one while officially working, in a public place, and I had to stop… Smiling through tears is just a bit conspicuous and probably kinda off-putting to the people who may need to approach me. Such a good message…

    Like

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